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Field shifts in sheriff's race

1/11/2012

By LOUIE BROGDON
The Brunswick News

The playing field changed Tuesday in the race for the next sheriff of Glynn County.

Former Glynn County Police Chief Carl Alexander announced he would withdraw his bid to be the county's chief lawman at the start of 2013, and Undersheriff Ron Corbett announced that he was putting his name in the hat.

The only other person to announce for the office is Glynn County Sheriff Deputy Maj. Neal Jump.

Sheriff Wayne Bennett announced in 2011 that he will not seek reelection and is now in the last year of his last four-year term.

Candidates won't begin to officially qualify for sheriff and other local, state and federal offices that will be on the July primary ballots until May 23.

Alexander said he decided against running after talking with his family.

"After lengthy discussions with my family, we have decided it is in our best interest to withdraw from the Glynn County Sheriff's race. This decision is not one which we have taken lightly. We believe that to continue my relationship with my employer is what's best for us," Alexander said in a prepared statement Tuesday.

Alexander, director of security for the Sea Island Co., said he appreciates the support he has received from his campaign committee and the community, but he had to do what was best for his family.

Corbett, who first came to Glynn County as a the jail administrator under former Sheriff Thomas "Slick" Jones, said Tuesday he can bring 32 years of law enforcement and administrative experience to the office.

"I've been with the sheriff's office for 22 years and came as jail administrator when it was a relatively new jail," Corbett said. "I have been very much a part of the jail operation, the issues concerning the new jail's location and I served as one of five special masters appointed by (U.S. District) Judge Lisa Godbey Wood," Corbett said.

Jump, retired commander of the Georgia State Patrol's Brunswick post, was the first to announce an interest in the position in June.

The former GSP commander has 37 years of law enforcement experience, and 16 of those years were spent in a supervisory position, he said Tuesday.

"I'm all in. I started and I'm going to finish," Jump said Tuesday.

Candidates qualifying as a Republican or Democrat will be listed on the July 31 primary ballots. The winner or winners will advance to the general election in November. Both Corbett and Jump said Tuesday they would run as Republicans.

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6 Comment

sheriff's race

What Does A Sheriff Do?
The duties of a county (or city) sheriff differ a bit than those of a police chief. In fact, not all sheriffs are responsible for street-type law enforcement, such as patrol. Remember, this may vary somewhat from one jurisdiction to another. In many areas the sheriff is the highest ranking law enforcement officer in the county.
Who is a sheriff?
1) Sheriffs are constitutional officers, meaning they are all elected into office by popular vote.
2) Sheriffs do not have a supervisor. They don’t have to answer to a board of supervisors or county administrator. However, any extra funding that’s not mandated by law is controlled by county government.
Sheriffs are responsible for:
1) Executing and returning process, meaning they serve all civil papers, such as divorce papers, eviction notices, lien notices, etc. They must also return a copy of the executed paperwork to the clerk of court.
2) Attending and protecting all court proceedings in the jurisdiction. A sheriff may appoint deputies to assist with all duties.
3) Preserve order at public polling places.
4) Publish announcements regarding sale of foreclosed property. The sheriff is also responsible for conducting public auctions of foreclosed property.
5) Serving eviction notices. The sheriff must sometimes forcibly remove tenants and their property from their homes or businesses.
6) Maintain the county jail and transport prisoners to and from court. The sheriff is also responsible for transporting county prisoners to state prison after they’re been sentenced by the court.
7) In many areas the sheriff is responsible for all law enforcement of their jurisdiction. Some towns do not have police departments, but all jurisdictions (with the exception of Alaska, Hawaii, and Connecticut) must have a sheriff’s office.
Sheriffs and their deputies have arrest powers in all areas of the county where they were elected, including all cities, towns, and villages located within the county.
What Does A Sheriff Do?
The duties of a county (or city) sheriff differ a bit than those of a police chief. In fact, not all sheriffs are responsible for street-type law enforcement, such as patrol. Remember, this may vary somewhat from one jurisdiction to another. In many areas the sheriff is the highest ranking law enforcement officer in the county.
Who is a sheriff?
1) Sheriffs are constitutional officers, meaning they are all elected into office by popular vote.
2) Sheriffs do not have a supervisor. They don’t have to answer to a board of supervisors or county administrator. However, any extra funding that’s not mandated by law is controlled by county government.
Sheriffs are responsible for:
1) Executing and returning process, meaning they serve all civil papers, such as divorce papers, eviction notices, lien notices, etc. They must also return a copy of the executed paperwork to the clerk of court.
2) Attending and protecting all court proceedings in the jurisdiction. A sheriff may appoint deputies to assist with all duties.
3) Preserve order at public polling places.
4) Publish announcements regarding sale of foreclosed property. The sheriff is also responsible for conducting public auctions of foreclosed property.
5) Serving eviction notices. The sheriff must sometimes forcibly remove tenants and their property from their homes or businesses.
6) Maintain the county jail and transport prisoners to and from court. The sheriff is also responsible for transporting county prisoners to state prison after they’re been sentenced by the court.
7) In many areas the sheriff is responsible for all law enforcement of their jurisdiction. Some towns do not have police departments, but all jurisdictions (with the exception of Alaska, Hawaii, and Connecticut) must have a sheriff’s office.
Sheriffs and their deputies have arrest powers in all areas of the county where they were elected, including all cities, towns, and villages located within the county.
With that being said, vote accordingly, but remember to vote (This is the important part of this whole process!!)

Passing through

1/11/2012

Corbett should have been one of the sheriffs officers to notify the state that Judge Williams was placing drug court participants in our county jail indefinitely and without the ability to see their attorney or receive medical attention.

Very Concerned

1/11/2012

At last..

Someone I can count on to lead the Sheriff's Office with integrity, fairness and lots of valuable experience in Jail Administration. Go Mr Corbett!

Concerned

1/11/2012

Sheriff

No knock to Mr Corbett, but I have known Neal and his family for years and he is the example of what a sheriff should be. He had worked outside of the "system", but has a career in, and has a vast knowledge of LE, and this is what we need in the next sheriff. Just because you do not work in the sheriff's office doesn't mean you don't have the ability and knowledge for the job of sheriff. Working in law enforcement, and in other branches of LE give a much needed outside view that will be appreciated in the position. He WILL get my vote!

Brian

1/11/2012

sheriff

as a juvenile and as an aldult i have never met a fair man such as mr corbitt, not saying that mr jump is any differance, its just that i feel that experience is best at this time,hes very stern and fair ,and i think that he needs to show whos been the back bone of this department for all the years pass,i think that he has helped mr bennett with all aspect of the jail operations, and have the best experaince to do the job, one who is deserving for the position,

gary cook

1/11/2012

New Sheriff

I'm glad to see someone with actual Sheriff's Office experience in the race. I'm sure Mr. Jump is a fine fellow, but working for GSP is hardly a qualification for being Sheriff.

fed up

1/11/2012







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